The Holy City has a garbage problem. In a survey of residents from 21 Israeli cities, Jerusalem came in last for cleanliness of streets (2.32/5) and in the timely and effective disposal of trash (2.69/5).

The study, which was conducted by Midrag, relied on data provided by 6,424 users. Based on the opinion of local residents, the results show a general lack of faith in the Jerusalem Municipality to keep the city clean.

This may be due, in part, to Mayor Nir Barkat using the city’s sanitation as political leverage in the budget battle via a yearly garbage strike that leaves pedestrians to navigate piles of trash and overflowing bins. Other likely culprits include a shortage of neighborhood cleaning crews and scarcity of rubbish cans on sidewalks.

Jerusalem also ranked low on the clearing of dog feces (2.12/5), a civic responsibility that many cities enforce through heavy fines and education.

The city’s cleanliness problems are not unique in Israel. Forty percent of municipalities failed to reach a grade of 3/5 or above on street cleanliness. The difference, however, is that Jerusalem’s score is down from last year.

(Header Photo By Amos Ben Gershom, Copyright © 2018 National Photo Collection)